Frontier supports major new study into static air support surfaces and treatment of pressure injuries

Published

Hot off the press, a new research report into the use of static air support surfaces in the treatment of pressure injuries has concluded that they should be considered a proven and effective method for reducing risk factors in patients.

The recent study, conducted across six Belgian nursing homes by researchers Brecht Serraes and Dimitri Beeckman, monitored the treatment and outcomes of 176 residents who met a number of key criteria, such as being bed or chair bound and over 65 years of age.

Using both control and test groups, they assessed residents’ condition and recovery when treated using a static mattress overlay, seat cushion, and heel wedge from our Repose range, compared to those without.

The researchers’ aim was to investigate the overall effectiveness of static air mattresses in treating pressure injuries, as despite the prevalence of pressure injuries there remains only limited evidence for these care practices.

The full study outlines their exact methods and analysis, but it’s their conclusion that is of most interest. Serras and Beeckman summarised that there was a much lower incidence of pressure injuries in those patients using a static overlay mattress, and they recommend that static air support surfaces should be considered as a treatment method for anyone deemed at risk.

It’s one of the few in-depth pieces of research into the topic offering real insight, and it reinforces the data that we collected during our own clinical trials for our Repose range.

Pressure injuries are now a significant concern, not only for care homes but for healthcare facilities as well, as an estimated 700,000 people of all ages are affected by pressure ulcers alone each year. To have this sort of independent analysis that highlights an effective form of treatment is invaluable, and we’re proud that our products were chosen to be a part of it.

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